IF YOU WANT TO RECEIVE ALERTS or NOTIFICATIONS of LIGHTNING STRIKES in
YOUR AREA of INTEREST or CONCERN
we provide links to
SOME TOOLS / WEBSITES / APPS that can
 
EARLY FIRE DETECTION SAVES RESOURCES AND LIVES
All of these tools can aid awareness of strikes, leading to identification of any resultant fires. Early fire identification and reporting can save resources, homes and lives.
 
We recommend several sites that will provide alerts / notifications to your online devices.
 
  1. LightningMaps.org              https://lightningmaps.org
    On home screen, select "America" in left column. Refine (navigate to) area of interest.  Select a period of time that strikes will show on screen of 15 minutes to 48 hours.
    Historical records are available in "Archives/Statistics.
    See associated App Blitzortung below.

  2. BlitzortungLive.      App
    On Apple or Android Deviice download App, BlitzortungLive.
    Navigate on map to area of interest.
    Click on the 3 horizontal bars on top left of screen.
    Select "Configuration"   ( Gear icon )
    Renavigate (if needed) to area of interest.
    Select "Live Strikes" and "Push Alert" on.
    Select and mark the centre of your area of interest with a "long tap" on the map.
    Move bottom bar below map to expand or shrink the notification radius of your point of interest.
    The App will send you notifications/alerts for strikes within that radius.

  3. My Lightning Tracker  App
    Down load Apple or Android App.
    Setup is similar to BlitzortungLive.

  4. Radar Maps from University of Washington.  https://atmos.uw.edu/current-weather/northwest-radar/ 
    Site gives active map (extending into Boundary and Okanagan) of weather systems and the likelihood of lightning in those systems.
    You can select up to past 8 hours of system movements and paths. Good for checking what might have passed through overnight.

  5. Cross Border (USA) Fire Information
    See links in Other Resources down this page

 
 
CONTACTS
 
Report a Wildfire:
1 800 663 5555 or *5555 on cell
 
 
Wildfire Service Wildfire Maps
here
 
BC Wilfire Service Home Page
multiple resources and contact numbers
here
 
RDKB Emergency Alert System
Sign up     here
CREDITS
 
 
This site was the result of conversations with George Delisle who suggested that lightning strike information made available to the public would provide an additional early warning system on fires and reduce damage and public costs.
George's Presentation to a recent Emergency Preparedness Workshop, Mar 30 2019
can be read            here.
Other Articles on Fire will be linked to the OTHER ARTICLES section below.
Symbols of strikes remain on screen for varying time periods. Have found it useful to take "screen-shots" that include areas of interest so that one can 'keep an eye' on strike location areas. Fires sometimes take days to develop in forested areas.
Scrren shots will also enable later comparisons with locations showing up on Provincial Government Fire Maps. (See CONTACTS List)
 
Contact Al Grant         250 446 2372 or boundaryalliance@ gmail.com with questions or suggestions or set-up help.
On the latter, maybe the grand-kids can also help.
OTHER RESOURCES
 
The 3 sites below provide fire mapping in Washington and Oregon that can include satellite data recognition of "hotspots" (burns) that may not have been detected by other means. An explanation of these satellite technologies,  MODIS and VIIRS, is at the end of this section.

 

 

Pacific Northwest Large Fire Interactive Maps

https://gacc.nifc.gov/nwcc/interactivemap/index.html?webmap=ed0a7dad32fe4848b20c6f91c74c79ea

 

ArcGis Interactive Maps

https://www.arcgis.com/home/webmap/viewer.html?webmap=ed0a7dad32fe4848b20c6f91c74c79ea

 

Northwest Fire Science Consortium. Oregon and Washington

http://www.nwfirescience.org/current-fire-information

 

 

FIRE IDENTIFICATION TECHNOLOGIES,   MODIS, VIIRS and MORE

 

In addition to lightning strike data, Fire Maps and our own Wildfire Service are informed by satellite technologies such as MODIS and VIIRS.

MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) is a view from about 438 miles height which sees every point in the world every 1-2 days and can "recognize" fires of about 700 to 800 square meters.depending on conditions and interference. (See MORE RESOURCES below)


VIIRS (Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite) is a view from about 500 miles up that provides full global coverage twice a day. In ideal conditions VIIR may recognize fire size of 50 square meters.  See MORE RESOURCES below)


FUEGO  (Fire Urgency Estimate in Geosynchronous Orbit) is a proposed system that would operate from 20,000 miles above earth and potentially spot fires covering just 10 x 10 feet, within two minutes.

https://www.nbcnews.com/mach/science/astrophysicist-has-audacious-plan-stop-wildfires-ncna899341
 
 
MORE RESOURCES     
Many thanks to BC Wildfire Service, Boundary Fire Zone (ministry of Forests Lands Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development) for these links.
 
Modis, Viirs and other data Daily;    Click the map for your area of interest and then view jpeg or pdf images.
https://fsapps.nwcg.gov/afm/activefiremaps.php?sensor=modis&extent=canada
 
Great sized U of W resolution map of real time satellite weather imagery. Covers broader area than University of Washington Radar Map.
https://a.atmos.washington.edu/~ovens/loops/wxloop.cgi?vis1km_west_full+12
 
Global Long Term Weather Models up to 240 hours in the future.
http://meteocentre.com/numerical-weather-prediction/deterministic-comparison.php?map=na&lang=fr&size=standard&run=00&stn=PNM&&range=long&type=sidebyside&hh=000
 
 
 
OTHER ARTICLES
 
The prevailing conventional wisdom in recent years has been that wildfires are largely the result of past fire suppression.
In this section we will feature articles that question or challenge that assumption and some of the myths that surround some notions of "managing" wildfire, the risks and downsides of a "let it burn" policy, and that wildfire or prescribed fire, "makes us safe"and provides environmental benefits.
With all the variables of time and place, there are no easy answers 
Our first article, George Delisle's presentation 'Wildfire History'  to Emergency Preparedness Workshop Mar 30 2019 takes a broad look at these issues and their complexity.         
 
 
DISCLAIMER
 
We do not make any warranties about the completeness, reliability or accuracy of information on this site or its links.
Any action you take upon the information on this website is strictly at your own risk and we will not be responsible for any losses and damages in connection with the use of our website.
Wildfire History by George Delisle                                                                                              here
Mar 30 2019 Presentation to Emergency Preparedness Workshop in Rock Creek, BC. 
LIGHTNING  and
WILDFIRE PAGE